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The Right Resistance: Why being on the ‘wrong side of history’ today is right for America’s tomorrow

The window to the “right side of history” is closing rapidly.

You hear the term a lot these days, especially when liberals talk about moving another one of their big government pipedream boondoggles through the legislative process. If you’re in Congress and favor a piece of legislation that purports to spend a ton of money or make some special interest constituency happy or leave yourself a lengthier and more noteworthy legacy, you’re on the “right side of history.”


In contrast, if you’re in Congress and oppose expanding government again because it’s too expensive or too burdensome on future generations or would deny Americans their essential liberties in specific manners -- or all of these reasons combined -- you’re labeled a denier, or against progress, or even worse, of occupying the “wrong side of history.”


Needless to say, Democrats and liberals positioned former President Donald Trump on the dark side and never allowed him to jump over, even with all the positive things Trump did for the country on economic growth, trade, peaceful foreign policy accomplishments or spearheading the development of a COVID vaccine.


By their nature, then, conservatives and most Republicans always end up on the “wrong side” of history in the opinion of the gimme-gimme crowd. But it's never been glamorous to stand up for something you can’t see or deposit in your checking account -- namely, freedoms enshrined in our Constitution -- so we’ll just have to live with our own impressions of our place in history.


With all the hubbub of late, liberals recognize that time could be running short on their opportunities to pass a laundry list of big bills that would supposedly cement their place on the “right side of history,” and they’re turning up the heat on President Joe Biden and Democrat congressional leaders to get moving. Their tortured definition of “infrastructure” might be the only issue where there could be an opening to cooperate with Republicans to get it done.


W. James Antle III wrote at The Washington Examiner last week:


“Infrastructure may be President Joe Biden’s last, best chance to strike a major bipartisan deal this term. Some liberals think he would be a fool to take it...


“’We need immediate action that will build a more just, equitable, clean, and more prosperous economy,’ [the leaders of a dozen liberal groups, including Clinton crony John Podesta] wrote. And while they don’t criticize Republicans by name, they express concern about these initiatives becoming diluted and precious time being expended in negotiations. ‘Specifically, we urge you to swiftly pass legislation that invests at least $4 trillion throughout the economy over this presidential term, bound by high-road labor, equity and climate standards,’ the liberals continued…


“In his address to a joint session of Congress, Biden hinted that he would only go the bipartisan route for so long. ‘We welcome ideas. But the rest of the world isn’t waiting for us,’ he said. ‘Doing nothing is not an option.’ Some of Biden’s supporters are less patient. ‘Those who argue for small-minded measures are on the wrong side of history [emphasis added],’ Podesta and the liberal leaders wrote.”


Huh? There’s that term again. Will someone please instruct me which is the right side of history and which is the wrong side, so I can secure a place on the correct team? Then again, if the “wrong side” means stopping Joe Biden’s and the Democrats’ disastrously bloated spending bills along with their heinous federal takeover of the elections process (H.R. 1 and S.R. 1) as well as their “Equality Act” suck-up to the LGBTQ lobby, then I’ll gladly caucus with the wrong-sters!


Put another way, if being “wrong” means fiscal responsibility, preserving freedoms, opposing the “woke” cancel culture and moving the America-First Make America Great Again agenda, then I don’t want to be “right”. If only Republicans were so adept at messaging. I’ve often wondered why liberty is such a hard sell in our twenty-first century universe, but it’s likely because the people (sheep) don’t understand what all of the Biden blather entails.


Senile Joe says “doing nothing is not an option,” and he “welcomes ideas”, but there’s little indication he hears anything but his own and his advisors’/handlers’ voices. I’ve said it many times, but neither party cares -- at all -- about “bipartisanship”. Some members pay the concept lip service -- wishy-washy RINO senators like the late John McCain and Susan Collins and Mitt Romney always do or did. And West Virginia Democrat Joe Manchin has to talk about working with Republicans because he hails from a state that gave almost 69 percent of its votes to Donald Trump. But the party leaders who pull the strings and push the levers are more than happy to do it solo. If you’re a Democrat, who needs Republicans to ruin history?


Antle mentioned that Minority Leader Mitch McConnell expressed a willingness to go up to $800 billion on infrastructure, but draws the proverbial red line at raising taxes.


Oops! There goes the chance of anything “bipartisan”, since Podesta and his cohorts aren’t about to settle for a bill that spends less than a measly trillion bucks and leaves the hated Trump tax rates still in place by the same token. This clearly puts Republicans on the “wrong side of history” because the “right side” doesn’t give a hoot about the national debt or interest rates or inflation -- or anything else.


And, lest we forget, Joe Biden needs a legacy. People won’t remember him without a signature legislative victory (think Obamacare for the Big O), will they? Obamacare passed without any Republicans in either the House or Senate lending a vote. Donald Trump got his tax bill through without any Democrats. The list goes on and on. The “right side of history” does lots of things without cooperation from the loyal opposition, which is why the liberals are twisting a knife in poor ol’ Joe Biden’s back now to get him to do something for them.


It's funny how we haven’t heard much lately about ditching the filibuster, which could indicate a couple things. First, Democrat leaders have seen the polls and surmise that it would equal political disaster for them to push everything through on a fifty-plus-Kamala basis. There’s only so much packaging liberals can do to try and make childcare sound like infrastructure.


There’s also the fact Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema haven’t relented on their pledge to hold fast on the filibuster. If Biden and “Chucky” Schumer spent their political capital and still lost on the issue, they’d be finished. They wouldn’t likely be able to pass a lot of their wish-list with just Democrat votes anyway. So why push the envelope?


Democrats seem distressed that the “wrong side of history” -- meaning, slow moving, common sense legislation -- appears to hold a much better hand here. House rules allow tyrants like Speaker Nancy Pelosi to suppress opposition and move practically whatever she wants without any stalling by the opposing side. But the senate is a different animal. Not only would McConnell be able to drag out the process, he could completely stop much of it without really trying.


If you don’t believe it, just ask “Chucky” Schumer how he did the same when Democrats were in the minority.


Therefore it doesn’t matter how much of a sense of urgency Democrats feel to enact their infrastructure proposals.


Time is catching up to the Biden White House. With real (not fake or concocted) crises cropping up all over the globe, the new regime can no longer hide behind phony COVID excuses for underperforming and incompetence. The American people want leadership and sound policy, not a bunch of “right side of history” puffery wrapped around big government nonsense.


  • Joe Biden agenda

  • infrastructure

  • Mitch McConnell

  • Kevin McCarthy

  • Nancy Pelosi

  • Charles Schumer

  • federal deficit

  • national debt

  • federal spending

  • 2022 elections

  • Donald Trump

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