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Courageous Conservative Idaho Legislators Pass Ban On Critical Race Theory

The Idaho state House has passed a bill banning critical race theory indoctrination in the

state's public schools. The legislation would prohibit schools from promoting race essentialism, collective guilt, and neo-segregation. The bill passed 27-8.


The measure had previously passed the Idaho House on a 57-12 vote with no Democratic support, and now heads to Governor Brad Little's desk.


The legislation would prevent educators from making students “affirm, adopt or adhere to” belief systems claiming individuals of any race, sex, ethnicity, religion or national origin are responsible for past actions done by members of the same group. It also would prohibit teachers from forcing students onto belief systems that claim a group of people as defined by sex, race, ethnicity or religion are inferior or superior to another.


Idahonews.com reported Republican Idaho lawmakers are concerned federal authorities could force belief systems on Idaho students through school curricula — calling the ideas often found in critical race theory “contrary to the unity of the nation and the well-being” of the state.


As a result, GOP lawmakers have been holding up crucial education budget bills until some type of bill addressing what can be taught in schools is passed. The House earlier this month killed a $1.1 billion teacher pay bill for that reason.


The bill is the first of many proposals aimed at ousting progressive-slanted educational practices from Idaho schools. It would ban school spending that in some way forces students to “adhere to” teachings it attributes to critical race theory — including that one race or sex is superior; that individuals should be treated adversely based on identity characteristics like race or sex; or that an individual is responsible for actions committed by members of their race or identity group in the past.


The bill’s sponsors pointed out their proposal doesn’t hinge on the term “critical race theory” that was heavily debated during the legislative session. The new law would simply bar schools from forcing students to adopt discriminatory beliefs, supporters say, not shut down debate programs or education about race’s role in U.S. history, as critics fear.


“This bill does not prohibit teaching about white supremacy, sexism, racism, communism or any other ism. In fact, the good the bad and the ugly are all on the table to be taught,” said sponsor Rep. Wendy Horman, R- Idaho Falls, in a prepared speech she delivered to the House and House Education Committee and reported by bigcountrynewsconnection.com.


Rep. Dorothy Moon, R-Stanley, pointed to a Biden executive order that, she said, “advances racial equity and supports underserved communities through the federal government.” The order makes no reference to changes in curriculum or the idea of critical race theory, but Moon concluded, “So the Biden administration does intend to implement critical race theory into our public schools through federal grants.”


Moon also quoted a federal rule as evidence for her fears, in which the administration commits to equity in education and culturally relevant teaching programs. It remains unclear how either document would conflict with HB 377, which legislators say is designed to prevent teachers from forcing students to adopt certain ideas.


But others placed more emphasis on problems they think exist now.


“I do disagree with” Education Committee Chairman Lance Clow, R-Twin Falls, “who said we’re being proactive with this bill,” said Blanchard Republican Heather Scott.


“This bill needed to be passed years ago. This has been creeping through our schools forever,” Scott said.


Anna Miller, who works for the Idaho Freedom Foundation, called the bill “a sufficient starting point,” but said it doesn’t go far enough in prohibiting “activism of such ideas” as critical race theory.


“We know critical race theory has already infiltrated many of our public schools and universities,” Miller said.


After an hour of back and forth about how the bill intersects with racism and anti-racism in U.S. education, Rep. Ben Adams, R-Nampa, said, “I’ve lived in a lot of places around the world, and America is still the least racist place I’ve ever been,” reported bigcountrynewsconnection.com.


Christopher Rufo, whose tireless efforts have exposed the insidious creep of critical race theory into the everyday curriculum of schools from elementary school to college applauded the passage of the Idaho bill with a tweet from @realchrisrufo saying: “Our movement is fearless; our movement is relentless; our movement is inevitable.”


We applaud the courageous Idaho legislators who took on the teacher unions, the school administrator’s cartel and other Leftists to send this important legislation to Governor Brad Little’s desk. We urge CHQ readers and friends to call Governor Little at 208-334-2100 to urge him to sign the bill forthwith. You can also email him through this link.


  • Idaho legislature

  • Critical race theory

  • 1619 Project

  • federal hiring practices

  • racism

  • Idaho public schools

  • race essentialism

  • collective guilt

  • neo-segregation

  • Governor Brad Little

  • slavery reparations

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